Where’s The Brand Love?

Brand love is that passion we hold for brands near and dear to our heart. We plan our trips for years (Disney), pay more for beautiful design (Apple) and cross the country for a burger (In-N-Out). It’s more than loyalty—it’s love.

We don’t usually associate love with consultants and advisors–when was the last time you heard someone wax poetic about their accountant? But it does exist: Seth Godin, for example. Yes, a little brand love can make your days happier, your selling easier and your bottom line fatter.

The “secret” is simple in concept, although devilish to execute:

Say no to any project that doesn’t stir your deep interest. The best love is mutual and you need to enter into it with excitement and purpose.

Assume your clients will be with you for life. Continually investing in your relationships creates ideal conditions for love to flourish.

Get comfortable with being direct AND empathetic. The advisor who can tell the truth with integrity and consideration is highly valued.

Why settle for a good project reference? Go for the love.




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11 Responses to Where’s The Brand Love?

  1. Ray Keefe says:

    What a great post Rochelle,

    I especially loved the challenge to only say "Yes" to projects that stir passion in me. It makes such good sense.


    Ray Keefe
    Successful Endeavours Pty Ltd

  2. Rochelle Moulton says:

    Hey Ray,
    So much more fun to go after the work that makes us sing–so glad you're doing it!

  3. Robin Dickinson says:

    Excellent, Rochelle.

    Succinctly put. Easy to say – harder to implement, but well worth aiming for.

    Well done.

    Best to you, Robin 🙂

  4. Rochelle Moulton says:

    Hi Robin,
    I think of you as someone who embodies this post. It's not easy for sure….

  5. Mike Van Horn says:


    Excellent post, and I agree with what you say. But I also see a limitation. If this is my business model, my growth is limited. It's hard for me to be engrossed in these passion-producing lifetime client relationships, yet have the bandwidth to step back and focus on growth. Growth beyond "more of the same at a higher price" requires me to either change what I'm passionate about, or take on essential growth management roles that I'm not passionate about.

    When I look at small operators who have grown successfully, they have changed what they are passionate about. "I used to love working with the customers on the floor, but I had to give most of that up. I was ready to move on. Now my passion lies in building and training growth teams so we can launch additional locations."


  6. Rochelle Moulton says:

    Really interesting and insightful comments Mike. I like your last example because he/she still followed their passion–they found a way to do what they love. Can growth and following the work you love co-exist?

  7. Gerald Bricker says:

    Studies show that 95% of buying decisions are made subconsciously. In other words, not rationally, but emotionally. "Love" is the emotional connection that our clients have with us, and vice versa. Client relationships create that love.

  8. Mary Volmer says:

    Thank you for these wonderful posts! I love my job and work to help my customers enjoy their work too by finding better, leaner ways of doing the same old thing. Understanding what makes your customer tick not only helps you connect with them on a personal level but aids in understanding their learning styles so you can reach them on their level. You're right — love is the key.

    Mary Volmer
    Project Manager, Guardian Business Solutions

  9. Rochelle Moulton says:

    Glad to hear your comments Gerald and Mary! Love is what makes it all work….

  10. Mike Van Horn says:

    @Can growth and following the work you love co-exist?

    “Business is inherently difficult. That’s why management is the highest spiritual calling I know.” M. Scott Peck, A Road Less Traveled

    When running a growing business, it is even harder to stay focused on the work you love, and easier to get pulled into nose-to-the-grindstone mode. I hear entrepreneurs brag about how hard they work — how many hours a week they put in.

    But it doesn't have to be this way. Staying "on passion" takes belief, discipline, and support.

    And when you do it, it is so-o-o-o satisfying!


  11. Sanat Sankrityayan says:

    Wow, this article really comes up as a breather for me. It is truly an eye opener. Especially, "Say no to any project that doesn’t stir your deep interest. The best love is mutual and you need to enter into it with excitement and purpose." Superb….

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