A Swipe Of Lipstick

A Swipe Of Lipstick 03 03 2014It was a casual Saturday and I was wearing one of my go-to errand outfits. The only thing I’d done differently was to grab a tube of hot pink lipstick.

All day long I raked in the compliments. Seriously? Over a swipe of new lipstick?


That lipstick was a lift:  a small and inexpensive—yet highly visible—refresh.

And isn’t that exactly what our brands—personal and otherwise—need from time to time?

Here are a few signs you may be ready for an update:

You made the last real change (blog posts don’t count) to your website over a year ago.

You’ve had the same logo, font and web images—including photos of you–for more than three years (if it’s been more than five, you may need more than lipstick).

Even you have to stifle a yawn when you look at your marketing materials.

Here’s the thing: if the look of your brand—your business—starts getting stale, so will you.

Few of us can afford to blend in with the woodwork—we need to review (and perhaps rethink) our business, our revenue model, our sales and marketing strategies at least yearly.

While there are times when nothing short of a total overhaul will do, the time may just be ripe for a new shade of lipstick.

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3 Responses to A Swipe Of Lipstick

  1. Ed Rosenbaum says:

    Well Rochelle, here is the problem. I had more than one of your signs showing I need an update. Now is the time to put it on the top of the bucket list. BTW, when are you going to show us a photo of you and the hot lipstick that got everyone’s attention?

  2. Rochelle says:

    Well that is excellent news Ed! And I did tape a Rochelle TV episode with the afore-mentioned pink lipstick–it’s the best I can do 🙂

  3. Corey Bearak says:

    Great way to note how we must be open to, and can benefit, by the “tweak.” Even subtle changes capture attention. For me the ability to make a change to my website whenever it occurs to me (unless I am totally without a device) and even then I may put a phone or text message to my backup who taught me how to do it (Content remains almost all mine though.).
    I did not broadcast the latest change to my website — posting a speech nearly 16 years old since its main theme got used to great success in my hometown last Spring, Summer and Fall; I wanted back to me since most know who used it before but not how it was brought to the earlier user.

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